Tuesday, June 11, 2013

The Scout Badge


The scout badge is not intended to represent the fleur-de-lis, or an arrowhead. It is a modified form of the sign of the north on the mariner's compass, which is as old as the history of navigation. The Chinese claim its use among them as early as 2634 B. C., and we have definite information that it was used at sea by them as early as 300 A. D. Marco Polo brought the compass to Europe on his return from Cathay. The sign of the north on the compass gradually came to represent the north, and pioneers, trappers, woodsmen, and scouts, because of this, adopted it as their emblem. Through centuries of use it has undergone modification until it has now assumed the shape of our badge.

 This trefoil badge of the scouts is now used, with slight local variations, in almost every civilized country as the mark of brotherhood, for good citizenship, and friendliness.

Its scroll is turned up at the ends like a scout's mouth, because he does his duty with a smile and willingly.

The knot is to remind the scout to do a good turn to someone daily.

The arrowhead part is worn by the tenderfoot. The scroll part only is worn by the second-class scout.
The badge worn by the first-class scout is the whole badge.

The official badges of the Boy Scouts of America are issued by the National Council and may be secured only from the National Headquarters. These badges are protected by the U. S. Patent Laws (letters of patent numbers 41412 and 41532) and anyone infringing these patents is liable to prosecution at law.

In order to protect the Boy Scout Movement and those who have qualified to receive badges designating the various degrees in scoutcraft, it is desired that all interested cooperate with the National Headquarters in safeguarding the sale and distribution of these badges. This may be done by observing the following rules:

1. Badges should not be ordered until after boys have actually complied with the requirements prescribed by the National Council and are entitled to receive them.
2. All orders for badges should be sent in by the scout master with a certificate from the local council that these requirements have been complied with. Blanks for this purpose may be secured on application to the National Headquarters.

Where no local council has been formed, application for badges should be sent direct to Headquarters, signed by the registered scout master of the troop, giving his official number.
Scout commissioners', scout masters', and assistant scout masters' badges can be issued only to those who are registered as such at National Headquarters.
Tenderfoot Badge--Gilt metal.
Patrol Leader's Tenderfoot Badge--Oxidized silver finish.
These badges are seven eighths of an inch wide and are made either for the button-hole or with safety-pin clasp. Price 5 cents.
Second-Class Scout Badge--Gilt metal.
Patrol Leader's Second-Class Scout Badge--Oxidized silver.
These badges--safety-pin style--to be worn upon the sleeve. Price 10 cents.
First-Class Scout Badge--Gilt metal.
Patrol Leader's First-Class Scout Badge--Oxidized silver.
Both badges safety-pin style--to be worn upon the sleeve. Price 15 cents.
Scout Commissioner's, Scout Master's, and Assistant Scout Master's Arm Badges.
These badges are woven in blue, green, and red silk, and are to be worn on the sleeve of coat or shirt. Price 25 cents.

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